It's really easy!

NonEntity's picture

It's really easy to make a fool of myself. Really. I do it on a regular basis. (I'm sure this is not news to any who have been paying attention!)

But I must say, it's fun and enriching to do so, and that is why I continue this pursuit.

The more I explore and the longer I live, the more I find life and reality and all to be dichotomous. For instance, I've been heard to proclaim that "rights" don't exist and even go so far as to imply that anyone who believes in them is a fool or some such gentle and tender mental lashing about the ears and skull. But note this: the reason I feel that rights don't exist is that some part of me believes that I have a right to live in a world which makes sense, with people who make sense. Ain't that just a HOOT! And the funny thing is that I really do believe in both of these contradictory ideas. Not only that, but I'm silly enough to proclaim this insanity publicly.

Don't ask me what it all means. But let me tell you one thing that I do know, it stimulates some really great conversations (that's the polite phrase for some of these encounters) and challenges me to examine my very core, which is a pursuit I find well worth the time and effort.

(And notice I didn't say "faith" once in this post!) (Well, except for there, of course.)

So here's to poking and prodding for fun and enlightenment. We're all just silly human beings, so what's to worry about if we have it all wrong, we can go about fixing it if we find the broken parts.

And as Eric Raymond (in The Cathedral and the Bazaar) quoted someone as best as I can recall, "You have to throw one away." Meaning that the first time you try to build something you'll royally screw it up and have to throw it away so that you can learn from the mistakes you made, so just count on it right up front. Also, someone else said, "Release soon and release often." I think this applies to life views and philosophies as well as software. Ain't it all software anyway?

Enjoy! (or get the hell out of the way so the rest of us can...)

- NonE

And the funny thing is that

And the funny thing is that I really do believe in both of these contradictory ideas.

A couple more impossible/contradictory things (before breakfast, natch) and you're gonna be in Alice in Wonderland territory.

No sweat!

No sweat, Happy. Not an issue as I've already HAD breakfast!

- NonE

A thought occurred to me

I've been heard to proclaim that "rights" don't exist ... . But note this: the reason I feel that rights don't exist is that some part of me believes that I have a right to live in a world which makes sense, with people who make sense. Ain't that just a HOOT!

I’ve noticed a similar dynamic in my own thinking. It occurred to me that perhaps the concept of rights originated from the omnipresent set of expectations we carry around, and use more or less consciously to measure others and our interactions with them.

The Origination of Rights

Natural rights are societal solutions to the problem of minimizing violence, which emerged over time as people (most particularly, our Germanic and Anglo-Saxon ancestors) figured out what worked and what didn't in societies without government. These solutions were then codified by philosophers like John Locke, but those philosophers didn't invent rights out of whole cloth. For some insights into this perspective, check out Toward a Theory of Empirical Natural Rights by John Hasnas.

Bumper Sticker

Which immediately got me to think of a new bumper sticker:

Natural Rights are Not

probably stimulated by that wonderful one from long ago:

The Moral Majority is Neither

;-)

- NonE

Unnatural Rights

By "natural rights" I meant the "traditional", so-called Lockean rights to life, liberty, and property -- not modern-day welfare rights and such. Just a clarification...

it's snowing!

so much of this world is what one makes it out to be. i hate the idea that one has to come to some understanding that they even have "rights". what are they? are we going to come up with some piece of paper similar to the worthless constitution and define what a person can and can't do? i hope not.

in thinking about what rights are i end up with this answer: it depends. no matter what right one thinks they have, try exercising it in an environment that wants to crush it. is it really a right? or is it a pseudo right--a right one should have but can't use? as this concept of rights breaks down it's easy for me to see it as just another construct we use to help define & maintain control of a chaotic world. does time exist other than what we've defined it as? of course not. there isn't a galactic clock except the one we've defined as the rotation of the earth on its axis to define a day and it around the sun as a year, back into logical pie slices, account for a leap year here and there, poof--watches on every wrist!

i'd love to ask the kid in oakland (now dead from a police gunshot to the back) what he thinks (thought) of rights? they only exist if there is agreement to respect them. since anyone at any time can violate them, do they really exist?

i don't know where to go from here without diving into the blackholes of existence & "why", so i think i'll go out and shovel the new snow.

Fighting snow

Yes, galactic snow fighter, that is exactly what I was attempting to say. And Saint's point is the one I was attempting to blow holes in. BLAM! BLAM! (don't take it "personal," Saint.) ;-)

- NonE