TMI

Sunni's picture

At the Midpoint of an Inadvertent Eating Experiment, the Data Are Fairly Clear

As I’ve mentioned a time or two in this space, for a couple of years now I’ve been eating more or less primally (for those who don’t know, it’s a variant in the paleo approach to eating and health that says dairy products are fine to eat if an individual has no problems with them). Because of his relaxed, “try various things and go with what works for you” approach to eating, I’ve made Mark’s Daily Apple a site I visit daily, and one I regularly check for food inspiration.

But the large backlash against the paleo approach set me to wondering if my results were fortuitous—due more to other factors than my change in foods. After reading the Atlantic’s lengthy (and somewhat sour-grapesy) article on the subject—This Is Your Brain on Gluten—I decided to turn my recent dietary slide into something of a case study.

Sunni's picture

Trying to Get Out of the “Reward” Mentality

Not just food treats, either. It’s proving to be more of a challenge than I anticipated.

Sunni's picture

At Another Crossroads

Not unexpectedly, reverberations from my new circumstances are making themselves known. However, some of the impulses I’ve had are a bit surprising to me ... and I’m not sure how much weight to give them. As one of the major areas of uncertainty centers on this place, I thought it wise to share some of my thoughts with the three visitors who’ve hung on here.

Sunni's picture

The Types of Freedom Aren’t as Disparate as I’d Thought

I find it extremely interesting that two of my dearest friends—neither of whom are going through an upheaval similar to mine—recently wrote me, musing about the intricacies of the different types of freedom. In reading their words, I realized that a choice I made a few years ago has created challenges for me today.

Sunni's picture

A Fresh Spring (in the Late Summer of My Life)

Meteorological spring also brought another spring to my life this year ... one that was very slow in arriving but has already proved well worth creating.

Sunni's picture

Where Has the Year Gone?

I didn’t mean to be absent from here for so long, but I’ve been busier than usual. Most of you would be quite surprised to learn what’s taken up a large chunk of my time of late.

Sunni's picture

Stupid Almonds.

Well, stupid me, actually—but like any other big-brained ape, I need a scapegoat to point to.

Sunni's picture

Celebrating Impending Cronehood

[Originally published April 2005]

I have never been concerned with my age, or aging in particular. Like my approach to race and sex, my approach to a person’s age—including my own—has always been: “You are what you are and you can’t (easily) change that”. Even so, as the silvery strands populate my crown more thickly, I can’t deny that I have been thinking more about the effects of the years—and miles—upon myself.

The impetus for this introspection has been the recurring topic of growing older in an email conversation with a very good friend. Being of like minds, it’s been mostly a positive exchange. I think we’ve helped each other with what might otherwise have been some rough spots, since it’s hard to completely ignore a culture that seems perpetually enamored with youth and firm, lithe bodies. When she mentioned that an acquaintance of hers recently celebrated her 50th birthday by throwing a “crone party”, the idea resonated with me very strongly. Why not celebrate an important, and potentially rich time of life—and the achievement of getting there?

I remember my grandmother calling the lines at the corners of her eyes “crow’s feet” when I was a youngster. The term horrified me, then and now. To me, the lines weren’t ugly; they were the sign of a face that had smiled and laughed much, enjoying the sun and wind and weather. I see the beginnings of them at the corners of my eyes, and instead of feeling a sinking dread, I welcome them. They’re reminders that I, too, have enjoyed much in my life thus far.

Similarly, my once-flat lower abdomen now curves a bit, a testament to my body's production of two children. As I enjoyed being pregnant very much, and enjoy my children, that new curve is a mostly pleasant reminder of two very special times in my life. To use a Heinleinian phrase, my baby-chewed breasts are softer now, but I wouldn’t trade their previous firmness for the many hours with a baby in my arms, gazing into his or her eyes as my body nourished theirs.

These days I’m moderately fit, instead of the very fit person I used to be—also something I refuse to feel guilty about (most of the time—again, those messages are hard to totally ignore). My life is so full that devoting the time it would take to maintain the body I once had is not a choice I want to make. I want to play with my children, who can’t hike, rock climb, or ski (yet); I want to savor the time spent reading a good book; I want to exercise because it feels good to feel my body stretching and moving, not because I have to maintain buns of steel.

I also refuse to count calories, or fat grams, or any such silliness, even though my body seems more likely to want to store excess than it has before. I’d much rather enjoy a decadent chocolate cake, a glass of red wine, and good conversation with beloved friends, and be a little wider in the behind for it, than be obsessed about thunder thighs and the Atkins diet, and be skinny and alone night after night.

I hope that I’ll be around to savor the intense spark of life in a grandchild. My mother railed against this sign of aging more than any other, and I’ve never understood that. What could be a more precious affirmation of life than creating new life—passing a bit of your spark into the future?

When I see a woman with stunning silver hair, I find myself hoping that when I’m completely grey, my hair is as gorgeous as hers. If not, I may just color it—something I’ve never even contemplated before—as a celebration of cronedom and the unique beauties it offers. I certainly will not cut it almost completely off, then curl, comb, tease, puff, or permanent the remnants, until I startle at my own appearance in the mirror every morning. My mane will remain long and flowing for as long as I’m able to care for it, or have someone willing to do so—and when someone isn’t, then it’s time for me to go.

My underwear—and nightwear, when I choose to wear it—will continue to come from Victoria’s Secret or similar place, even though I never have and never will look like their models. Must one be under 35 to appreciate the glissando of silk on one’s skin? Or even better, the caress of satin under an appreciative lover’s hand? Both feel better now for having slept in some of the interesting situations I’ve found myself in over the years.

In short, as I progress into another phase of life, I fully intend to drink fully of its offerings, learn as much as I can from both its pleasures and its pains, and do things the way I want, rather than the way “little old ladies” are expected to. That’s the way I have always been. Why should I stop when I become a crone?

It’s been said before that I’m a mutant. Maybe I am. But I see no value in denying what one is—who one is—for the sake of fitting in with a culture that is in many ways profoundly unhealthy. To me, becoming a crone is an important milestone, one well worth celebrating.

I think I’ll begin planning my crone party.

Sunni's picture

Happy Crone Day

To me!

Sunni's picture

Angry and Sad

And I vacillate between which I feel more strongly.

Sunni's picture

“Bleeding heart” ... er, What, Exactly?

Two people very dear to me frequently describe themselves as a “bleeding heart liberal”. Noticing that yesterday set me off down another cognitive rabbit hole ...

Sunni's picture

This Proves We’re Ready for an Audition for “Hoarders”

After years of carting around boxes full of stuff of unknown provenance, I decided to sort through them. O.M.G.

Sunni's picture

And People Say Knitting Relieves Stress ...

It ain’t always so.

Sunni's picture

Check Out My Shoes!

Bet most of y’all never expected me to channel Imelda Marcos. Truth be told, I’m not—this is the first pair of new shoes I’ve bought in at least five years. And they aren’t pretty. Still, I adore them.

Sunni's picture

To Some of Us, the Small Things Matter

Creating a live–action movie from a book must be an amazing, arduous process. The director probably likes the book to even consider such a project. So it would stand to reason that certain details provided by the author would be preserved, insofar as such things are possible. I guess the only explanation is that Hollywood reason is like no other reason I know.